I show concerned parents who want to give their children the best start to life how to better understand their children.

21 Oct 2013

Indie author blog tour: Depression and your child by Deborah Serani


About the Author:
Dr. Deborah Serani is a go-to media expert on a variety of psychological issues. Her interviews can be found in ABC News, Newsday, Womens Health & Fitness, The Chicago Tribune, The Associated Press, and affiliate radio station programs at CBS and NPR, just to name a few. She is a ShareCare Expert for Dr. Oz, writes for Psychology Today, helms the "Ask the Therapist" column for Esperanza Magazine and has worked as a technical advisor for the NBC television show Law & Order: Special Victims Unit. A licensed psychologist in practice over twenty years, Serani is also an adjunct professor at Adelphi University teaching courses in clinical disorders and treatment and is the author of the award-winning book “Living with Depression.”
Her latest book is Depression and Your Child: A Guide for Parents and Caregivers.
Visit her website at www.drdeborahserani.com.
Connect & Socialize with Deborah!
TWITTER | FACEBOOK | GOODREADS

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About the Book:
Seeing your child suffer in any way is a harrowing experience for any parent. Mental illness in children can be particularly draining due to the mystery surrounding it, and the issue of diagnosis at such a tender age. Depression and Your Child gives parents and caregivers a uniquely textured understanding of pediatric depression, its causes, its symptoms, and its treatments. Author Deborah Serani weaves her own personal experiences of being a depressed child along with her clinical experiences as a psychologist treating depressed children.

Current research, treatments and trends are presented in easy to understand language and tough subjects like self-harm, suicide and recovery plans are addressed with supportive direction. Parents will learn tips on how to discipline a depressed child, what to expect from traditional treatments like psychotherapy and medication, how to use holistic methods to address depression, how to avoid caregiver burnout, and how to move through the trauma of diagnosis and plan for the future.
Real life cases highlight the issues addressed in each chapter and resources and a glossary help to further understanding for those seeking additional information. Parents and caregivers are sure to find here a reassuring approach to childhood depression that highlights the needs of the child even while it emphasizes the need for caregivers to care for themselves and other family members as well.
Purchase your copy at AMAZON or at Rowman & Littlefield Publishing Group.

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YouTube Code for Book Trailer:

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Copy & Paste (add graphics) for Book Spotlights:
Title: Depression and Your Child: A Guide for Parents and Caregivers
Genre: Self-Help, Parenting
Author: Deborah Serani
Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers (September 16, 2013)
Pages: 242
Language: English
ISBN-10: 1442221453
ISBN-13: 978-1442221451
Seeing your child suffer in any way is a harrowing experience for any parent. Mental illness in children can be particularly draining due to the mystery surrounding it, and the issue of diagnosis at such a tender age. Depression and Your Child gives parents and caregivers a uniquely textured understanding of pediatric depression, its causes, its symptoms, and its treatments. Author Deborah Serani weaves her own personal experiences of being a depressed child along with her clinical experiences as a psychologist treating depressed children.

Current research, treatments and trends are presented in easy to understand language and tough subjects like self-harm, suicide and recovery plans are addressed with supportive direction. Parents will learn tips on how to discipline a depressed child, what to expect from traditional treatments like psychotherapy and medication, how to use holistic methods to address depression, how to avoid caregiver burnout, and how to move through the trauma of diagnosis and plan for the future.
Real life cases highlight the issues addressed in each chapter and resources and a glossary help to further understanding for those seeking additional information. Parents and caregivers are sure to find here a reassuring approach to childhood depression that highlights the needs of the child even while it emphasizes the need for caregivers to care for themselves and other family members as well.

Excerpt:
When you held your child for the very first time, you were likely brimming with pride and joy. Your heart swelling with enormous love, you’re swept away with streams of thoughts for what your child needs in this immediate moment—as well as plans and dreams for the future. You expect there to be wondrous adventures your child will experience, as well as bumps in the road along the way.
And that’s okay, you say, because you know that life isn’t always an easy journey.
But one thing you probably never considered was how an illness like depression could take hold of your child. And why would you? Up until recently, it was never believed that children could experience depression. Long ago, studies suggested that children and teenagers didn’t have the emotional capacity or cognitive development to experience the hopelessness and helplessness of depression.
Today, we know that children, even babies, experience depression. The clinical term is called pediatric depression, and rates are higher now than ever before. In the United States alone, evidence suggests that 4 percent of preschool-aged children, 5 percent of school-aged children, and 11 percent of adolescents meet the criteria for major depression.
Depression and Your Child grew out of my experience of being a clinician who specializes in the treatment of pediatric depression. I wanted to write a parenting book to raise awareness about depressive disorders in children, to teach parents how to find treatment, to offer tips for creating a healthy living environment, and to highlight important adult parenting matters such as self-care, romance, and well-being.
I also wrote this book because I have lived with depression since I was a child. As is the case with pediatric depression, my own depression didn’t hit with lightning-like speed. It was more of a slow burn, taking its toll in gnaws and bites before hollowing me out completely. After a suicide attempt as a college sophomore, I found help that finally reduced my depression. Until then, I accepted the sadness, despair, and overwhelming fatigue as the way my life just was. I never realized, nor did my parents or any other adults, that I had a clinical disorder. I’ve since turned the wounds from my childhood into wisdom and believe that sharing the textures of my experiences will help parents realize what their own depressed child is going through.
More than anything else, I want this book to offer hope. As a clinician, proper diagnosis and treatment can be life-changing and life saving. As a person living with depression, I have found successful ways to lead a full and meaningful life. I want parents and children who struggle with depression to feel this hope, too—and in these pages, that’s what you’ll find.
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Depression and Your Child Tour Page:
http://www.pumpupyourbook.com/2013/08/22/virtual-book-tour-pump-up-your-book-presents-depression-and-your-child-virtual-book-publicity-tour/

Parenting Techniques Every Parent Should Know

By,
Dr. Deborah Serani


Discipline comes from the word disciple, which, in Latin, means to teach. Parenting with discipline teaches children to feel good about themselves, develop self-control and become accountable for their actions. Punishment, on the other hand, focuses on what’s being done wrong instead of what’s being done right - and places the responsibility for behavioral management on the parent instead of encouraging the child to be responsible. Here are 5 powerful tools every parent should know how to use. Take a look and see how you can incorporate them into your parenting repertoire.

1. Catch your child being good: Giving attention to bad behavior reinforces bad behavior. Resist nagging, reminding, commenting on what your child ISN’T doing. When you focus on good and desirable behavior, however small it might be,  you reinforce that positive behavior. Adding the technique where you let others know about your child’s positive behaviors is called The Pony Express – and offers another round of positive reinforcement for your child to experience. You can use The Pony Express in person with others or on the phone. The idea here is for your child to hear you praising her to others. “You know, Jane worked all weekend on her project. All her hard work paid off because the teacher gave her an A.”
2. Drop the rope. Avoid power plays with your child because Tug-of- War will give your rope burn. Remember that your child’s arguing with you or resisting limits is all about control. So if you want this, and he wants that consider dropping the rope . If you don’t and keep this game going, you’ll be pulling and tugging till you’re both overwhelmed. Instead, give your child two choices – leaving the decision to him to make. Remember it takes two to tug the rope. If you drop your end and place the responsibility onto your child, you make him accountable. If he fails, it’s by his own hand. “Listen, before bed, either put all your laundry in the hamper or clean up the dishes in your room.” The implication here is that one of these will be done.
3. Use positive direction. Telling your child what you want, instead of what you don’t want is called positive direction. “Hang your coat up” is different than “Don’t throw your coat on the floor.” Listen to how you’re communicating with your child. Change negative directions to positive ones. You’ll be amazed how differently your child will react.  Your child will hear Hang- Coat-Up. Instead of Coat-On-Floor. Using positive direction is like the force in Star Wars. When you make use of it like Ben Kenobi, you direct others to do what you want.
4. Grounding is the technique of restricting freedom of movement, use of technology or social connection for a period of time from your child. Make sure, however,  the time fits the crime. Making a time period too long for misbehavior can backfire. And never ground your child on a special occasion. Make sure your words are constructive and not demeaning.  “I’m disappointed that you went over the text time limits on the phone bill. You need to get better tracking that. Think about that this weekend while you’re grounded from using your cell phone.” Remember, we want the discipline to teach your child what she needs to learn.
5. Understand the benefit of failure. It’s going to be hard, but allowing your child to fail will make him a success. Failure brings discomfort, regret, fear and disappointment - and these can be tremendous tools to teach your child how to self-regulate. Parents often come from a place of good intentions when they micromanage their child’s life, but doing so often prevents children from learning the necessary coping skills to function independently. Instead of nagging about bedtime, allow your child to learn the lesson of being tired the next day. Worried about the upcoming test and your child hasn’t cracked the book open? Let the shame of a poor grade do the talking, not you. Don’t rub the failure in with a snarky comment or an “I told you so.” The point here is not to make you the focus of your child’s anger. Instead, we want him to be angry at his own failure.

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