I show concerned parents who want to give their children the best start to life how to better understand their children.

2 Sep 2013

What books can do to improve us as people - Part 2

In addition to the way we communicate today, technology has also influenced how we entertain ourselves. Many people believe that lying in front of the TV and allowing one’s brain to rot is an acceptable past time. We perpetuate this in our society. TV isn’t the only electronic way we entertain ourselves. There is also internet and video games and many others.

Because of all of this, the demand for information is almost instant today. Instead of using what’s inside our heads to figure something out, many would rather just Google it. Some can’t even do a simple two times two without a calculator, because they never bothered to learn their times tables. This is often the state of our current society. In addition, only one per cent of our population are book buyers, fourteen per cent are regular readers and a very miniscule five per cent of parents read to their children.

So what, some of you may ask. What’s the big deal with all that? It’s my life, so what if I want to lie around all day and watch TV, and communicate with everyone via MXIT. Well, with TV specifically, scientists have conducted many studies. They proved that too much TV could lead to anti-social behavior, addiction and other mental illnesses. Especially when we are children, TV can lead to an underdeveloped brain. When we are growing up, there are window periods where certain parts of our brains mature and expand. If our brains aren’t stimulated during these window periods, the damage can be irreversible, and your brain may never fully develop. Unfortunately, TV doesn’t stimulate many of these parts of the brain. TV can also lead to an inability to speak properly. Human beings learn to communicate with one another via face-to-face interactions, not from a TV screen. Further to this, and contrary to what some believe, there is little educational benefit from watching TV.

In his poem Charlie and the Chocolate Factory, written in the early 1960’s, Roald Dahl warned about the destructive effects of TV viewing: “It kills the imagination dead!” and children’s “powers of thinking rust and freeze!” On the left, is the cover for the book Charlie and the Chocolate Factory along with another Roald Dahl book James and the Giant Peach, which we read when I was in school.

Despite all this, technology continues to infiltrate our society. At the same time however, depression and other mental illnesses are also on the rise. We can only wonder if there is a link between them… I’m sure labs and universities all over the world have conducted many studies on this subject, but I want to give you my take.

What books can do to improve us as people - Part 1
What books can do to improve us as people - Part 3
What books can do to improve us as people - Part 4
What books can do to improve us as people - Part 5
What books can do to improve us as people - Part 6
What books can do to improve us as people - Part 7
What books can do to improve us as people - Part 8
What books can do to improve us as people - Part 9
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I show concerned parents who want to give their children the best start to life
how to better understand their children.
And I show people who are facing difficulties that they are not alone

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